Even though Charlie’s on Main is vacating its space by the end of the month, the Oregon community may still be able to keep “Good Company."

That’s through a restaurant concept that would offer outreach efforts as a side to boutique-style wines, artisan pizzas and an “urban” aesthetic. Those efforts might include bringing an outdoor seating program similar to Madison's "Streatery" and a farmers market to downtown Oregon, as well as investments in the new public library project.

Oregon resident Patrick Sweeney and his childhood friend Matthew Stebbins, who both own the Brother’s Three establishment on Madison’s east side, are set to remodel the 113 S. Main St. space and open their new restaurant and bar, Good Company, before Christmas. He and Stebbins run a real estate enterprise and restaurant operations company, Sweeney also being the co-owner of downtown Madison bars Merchant and Lucille.

That means the duo is always planning for new opportunities, Sweeney said.

So when Charlie’s on Main announced it was closing earlier this month, they sprang into action and prepared a design. And since Sweeney, his wife and two children moved to Oregon in April, he said he wanted to give back to the small community he had quickly grown to love.

Renovations to the indoor space will hopefully begin in a few weeks, and last around 45 days, Sweeney said.

Construction workers would expose the brick of the “beautiful historical building,” and connect the Charlie’s on Main and Main Event space, which is currently a dining room reserved for catered events that's separate from the bar. The Good Company concept features a wrap-around horseshoe bar, and a color palette with teals, grays and charcoal greens that evoke an urban and open atmosphere -- complete with natural lighting.

“What we like to do is put the bar right in the middle of the action,” Sweeney said. “It keeps the vibe fun, relaxed and bustling.”

The duo has planned for a harsh pandemic winter, with dining scenarios at 25% and 50% capacity per Dane County public health guidance, Sweeney said.

He anticipates business would pick up by next spring and summer — when he and his partner would really start working with the Village of Oregon on the outdoor seating program, the farmers market, new library investments and other outreach.

The seating program would be modeled after Madison’s Streatery, which the city implemented to aid restaurants and taverns financially impacted by COVID-19, Sweeney said. Establishments were able to extend their services into streets and parking spaces over the summer.

Menu options would be primarily pizza-focused, he said, made with fresh and locally grown ingredients and on a wood-fired stove. Sweeney said there will also be “supper club nods” like Friday night fish frys, weekend brunch, salads and pastas.

Drinks would include self-tap beer, “old staples” like Manhattan and old fashioned cocktails as well as a variety of wines.

Sweeney said “we can use all the support and encouragement we can get right now.” He encouraged those who would like to support Good Company to check out its Facebook and Instagram.

Email Emilie Heidemann at emilie.heidemann@wcinet.com or follow her on Twitter at @HeidemannEmilie.